Successful Anti-Malaria campaign at Crossover


 

Due to a host of technical difficulties, communications have been cut off with Crossover International Academy for about the last 6 months. In that timeframe, a lot of positive developments have occurred and the school continues to thrive. We are particularly proud of the student led efforts to combat malaria on the Crossover campus.

Through UNICEF, the United Nations publishes annual statistics on malaria. Each year, the citizens of Ghana face a difficult battle against malaria. According to the UNICEF 2013 Annual Fact Sheet, a total of

  • 3.5 million people contract malaria every year in Ghana.
  • Approx. 20,000 children die from Malaria every year (25 per cent of the deaths of children under the age of five).
  • Even if a child survives, the consequences from severe malaria such as convulsions or brain dysfunction can hamper long-term development and schooling.

Our experience with Crossover confirms the dreary statistics. Since 2012, Dave Yayravi, the founder of Crossover, has had malaria three times. In addition, his youngest son and his youngest daughter have both had to endure extremely difficult bouts with malaria. Additionally, several kids at Crossover have died from the deadly since 2012.

There is hope. A group of Pegasus students, led by Mia Conti and Ishika Sashdeva, researched the most effective ways to combat malaria. After a lot of investigation, they decided that the best way to combat malaria is to use Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs) combined with anti-malaria pills. With dedication and determination, students here raised enough money to purchase 300 Insecticide Treated Nets and enough money to purchase the first round of anti-malaria pills. The nets will help prevent new mosquito bites at night, when mosquitos are most active. Malaria is a parasite and can remain dormant in the human system for a long time. Therefore, anti-malaria pills can help prevent latent malaria from becoming active. The combined approach will significantly reduce active malaria cases at Crossover.

At Wings for Crossover, we are thrilled to have the opportunity to save our friends at Crossover from the crushing effects of malaria. So far, the plan is working. Dave is reporting less incidents of malaria. If you would like to help with this campaign, there is an ongoing need to purchase anti-malaria pills. Thank you for your continued interest and support.

 

Young Crossover students sleeping under their nets.

Young Crossover students sleeping under their nets.

Crossover students celebrating the arrival of their new insecticide treated nets.

Crossover students celebrating the arrival of their new insecticide treated nets.

Excitement at the arrive of insecticide treated malaria nets.

Excitement at the arrive of insecticide treated malaria nets.